lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

You asked for it, and it’s yours.
Presenting Kevin from Up. I take back what I said, this is the hardest skeletal ever. By request of raptorcivilization!
Please, all you ornithophiles out there ( killdeercheer, avisuchian, etc), feel free to nitpick this.
A bit of preliminary taxonomy: being obviously modelled off Raphus, the bird is clearly a columbiform. One of the largest indigenous columbiformes I could find was the grey-fronted dove (Leptotila rufaxilla), which currently has a diet consisting mainly of seeds. Being a LC on the IUCN Red List, it’s very much possible that the species could gain an evolutionary advantage in their environment. With several factors affecting the decline of Amazonian mammalian predators, gigantism is certainly possible, and once you’re big and tough you can be as flashy as you want. So… yeah.
Even the females of this species, the Great Plumed Snipe-dove, are flashy. Did I mention that Kevin is actually female? Whelp, now I have.

My most popular Disney skeletal, shortly after which I abandoned the series, possibly for good.

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

You asked for it, and it’s yours.

Presenting Kevin from Up. I take back what I said, this is the hardest skeletal ever. By request of raptorcivilization!

Please, all you ornithophiles out there ( killdeercheer, avisuchian, etc), feel free to nitpick this.

A bit of preliminary taxonomy: being obviously modelled off Raphus, the bird is clearly a columbiform. One of the largest indigenous columbiformes I could find was the grey-fronted dove (Leptotila rufaxilla), which currently has a diet consisting mainly of seeds. Being a LC on the IUCN Red List, it’s very much possible that the species could gain an evolutionary advantage in their environment. With several factors affecting the decline of Amazonian mammalian predators, gigantism is certainly possible, and once you’re big and tough you can be as flashy as you want. So… yeah.

Even the females of this species, the Great Plumed Snipe-dove, are flashy. Did I mention that Kevin is actually female? Whelp, now I have.

My most popular Disney skeletal, shortly after which I abandoned the series, possibly for good.

Reblogged from lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

You saw the first draft, now take a look at the full teaser poster for dinostuck's top secret project! Here you see not a bunch of random dinosaurs, but those from the Dinosaur Park fauna. More posters are coming soon so stay tuned!
UPDATE: Added quills to the Stegoceras and gave Chasmosaurus a bit more fluff as per request of raptorcivilization and dinostuck! Thanks for your input!

The poster that started it all.

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

You saw the first draft, now take a look at the full teaser poster for dinostuck's top secret project! Here you see not a bunch of random dinosaurs, but those from the Dinosaur Park fauna. More posters are coming soon so stay tuned!

UPDATE: Added quills to the Stegoceras and gave Chasmosaurus a bit more fluff as per request of raptorcivilization and dinostuck! Thanks for your input!

The poster that started it all.

Reblogged from lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king

raptorcivilization:

…except for platypus beaks being totally different from bird beaks. Look at this thing:

And tell me that looks like

If I was a future paleontologist looking at platypus skulls I’d assume something similar to Atopodentatus.

Except, you know, crossed with Cthulhu and insect mandibles.

raptorcivilization:

…except for platypus beaks being totally different from bird beaks. Look at this thing:

And tell me that looks like

If I was a future paleontologist looking at platypus skulls I’d assume something similar to Atopodentatus.

Except, you know, crossed with Cthulhu and insect mandibles.

Reblogged from raptorcivilization

thebeastfrom20000fathoms:

raptorcivilization:

onlywhenshared:

kevincatalan:

Hey kids, heres a fun fact about how speculative paleontologists and paleotographists work can be sometimes. A trend in paleoart is this thing call “shrink-wrapping” which is basically just adding some muscle and skin on top of bones to giv…e the animal a very close resemblence to the skeleton. But we tend to forget that there are lots of soft tissues that never fossilize such as fat and stuff. To illustrate what i mean heres a skeleton of an orca. One shows how someone would draw it with the mindset of a paleontographist and obviously on the bottom is how the animal really lookced like. Goes to show we’ll never ever ever ever ever EVER know what extinct animals REALLY looked like.

This is AMAZING, I think a lot about this. Baleen whales would be an even more convenient example: how the hell do you imagine a whale out of this thing http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/16/Whale_skeleton.png

Here’s a modern animal shrink-wrap I haven’t seen before!

There are some species of Dinosaurs where we’re pretty certain what they looked like (Triceratops, Hadrosaurs, and pretty much all feathered dinosaurs in China). The reason is because we discovered naturally ‘mummified’ specimens of them (Triceratops and Hadrosaur). Using the data collected by them, we infer what the others of the same family might have looked like. Infer is the key word, we’re still really not certain. There could be so much we’re still missing. This kind of stuff just blows my mind every time. 

Well, hear, hear. Just because we have natural skin impressions or molds or even preserved specimens, it doesn’t really give us the entire picture. Muscle and fat decay after death; a significant amount of bulk is lost. Just compare a normal cow to one that’s starved to death. For many others, we really have no idea at all. All we can do is trace around the skeleton, maybe fatten it here and there. The All Yesterdays movement is here to change that; it provides a radical new view of dinosaurs as dynamic creatures beyond the shrink wrap. Speaking of which, it also provides some counterexamples. For those of you who haven’t seen yet:






Good luck guessing.

thebeastfrom20000fathoms:

raptorcivilization:

onlywhenshared:

kevincatalan:

Hey kids, heres a fun fact about how speculative paleontologists and paleotographists work can be sometimes. A trend in paleoart is this thing call “shrink-wrapping” which is basically just adding some muscle and skin on top of bones to give the animal a very close resemblence to the skeleton. But we tend to forget that there are lots of soft tissues that never fossilize such as fat and stuff. To illustrate what i mean heres a skeleton of an orca. One shows how someone would draw it with the mindset of a paleontographist and obviously on the bottom is how the animal really lookced like. Goes to show we’ll never ever ever ever ever EVER know what extinct animals REALLY looked like.

This is AMAZING, I think a lot about this. Baleen whales would be an even more convenient example: how the hell do you imagine a whale out of this thing http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/16/Whale_skeleton.png

Here’s a modern animal shrink-wrap I haven’t seen before!

There are some species of Dinosaurs where we’re pretty certain what they looked like (Triceratops, Hadrosaurs, and pretty much all feathered dinosaurs in China). The reason is because we discovered naturally ‘mummified’ specimens of them (Triceratops and Hadrosaur). Using the data collected by them, we infer what the others of the same family might have looked like. Infer is the key word, we’re still really not certain. There could be so much we’re still missing. This kind of stuff just blows my mind every time. 

Well, hear, hear. Just because we have natural skin impressions or molds or even preserved specimens, it doesn’t really give us the entire picture. Muscle and fat decay after death; a significant amount of bulk is lost. Just compare a normal cow to one that’s starved to death. For many others, we really have no idea at all. All we can do is trace around the skeleton, maybe fatten it here and there. The All Yesterdays movement is here to change that; it provides a radical new view of dinosaurs as dynamic creatures beyond the shrink wrap. Speaking of which, it also provides some counterexamples. For those of you who haven’t seen yet:

Good luck guessing.

Reblogged from thebeastfrom20000fathoms

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

Nitpicking just because. Boy I nailed some of these right on the head didn’t I?

Ahh, yes, cliché clip art palaeoart. We still don’t know much about JW, but I guarantee some clichés and some casual references.

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

Nitpicking just because. Boy I nailed some of these right on the head didn’t I?

Ahh, yes, cliché clip art palaeoart. We still don’t know much about JW, but I guarantee some clichés and some casual references.

Reblogged from lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king asked:

I love your new transparent icon! :D

thebeastfrom20000fathoms answered:

//Oh! Thanks!! It took a while to get it right, but I agree it came out fine. I was actually inspired by your icon to do it, so I have 2 things to thank you for!! :D

That’s wonderful! It came out really nicely, with a kind of Dinosaur Revolution Tyrannosaurus feel to it! Speaking of which, I should also change my icon to some of my own concept art… But, of course, I don’t think that’ll be necessary…

masterlistens:

sunshinesunicornsandboobs:

ambroseaddicted:

ultrafacts:

10 Studying/homework Tips!

Want more posts like these daily? Click HERE to follow Ultrafacts!

Where was this when I was in school???

THIS AWESOME

NONONONONONONO!!!!!!!!

13/34 = 0.382 it does NOT equal 1/4

15/54 = 0.278 it does NOT equal 1/4

17/74 = 0.230 it does NOT equal 1/4

27/75 = 0.36  it does NOT equal 2/5 

28/85 = 0.329  it does NOT equal 2/5

29/95 = 0.305 it does NOT equal 2/5

If you’ve blogged this shit, please unblog it!!!

Goddammit, anyone who’s checked it will know that that is completely and utterly wrong!

Reblogged from laserfilth